Discus throwing

The discus throw is an olympic style events occasion in which a competitor tosses a substantial circle—called a disk—trying to check a more remote separation than their rivals. It is an antiquated game, as exhibited by the fifth-century-BC Myron statue, Discobolus. In spite of the fact that not some portion of the cutting edge pentathlon, it was one of the occasions of the antiquated Greek pentathlon, which can be gone back to in any event to 708 BC.

History

Plate is a standard piece of most present day olympic style events meets at all levels and is a game which is especially famous of the Olympic Games. The men’s opposition has been a piece of the cutting edge Summer Olympic Games since the main Olympic amusements in 1896. Pictures of disk hurlers figured unmistakably in promoting for early present day Games, for example, raising money stamps for the 1896 diversions and the primary blurbs for the 1920 and 1948 Summer Olympics.

The plate was re-found in Magdeburg, Germany, by Christian Georg Kohlrausch and his understudies in the 1870s. His work around the disk and the prior tossing systems have been distributed since the 1880.

The main current competitor to toss the disk while turning the entire body was František Janda-Suk from Bohemia (show Czech Republic).He created this system when considering the situation of the well known statue of Discobolus. After just a single year of building up the method he picked up the olympic silver in 1900.

The ladies’ opposition was added to the Olympic program in the 1928 recreations, despite the fact that they had been contending at some national and provincial levels already.

Top 25 performers

Men

Rank Mark Athlete Venue Date
1 74.08 m (243 ft 0​12 in)  Jürgen Schult (GDR) Neubrandenburg 6 June 1986
2 73.88 m (242 ft 4​12 in)  Virgilijus Alekna (LTU) Kaunas 3 August 2000
3 73.38 m (240 ft 8​34 in)  Gerd Kanter (EST) Helsingborg 4 September 2006
4 71.86 m (235 ft 9 in)  Yuriy Dumchev (URS) Moscow 29 May 1983
5 71.84 m (235 ft 8​14 in)  Piotr Małachowski (POL) Hengelo 8 June 2013
6 71.70 m (235 ft 2​34 in)  Róbert Fazekas (HUN) Szombathely 14 July 2002
7 71.50 m (234 ft 6​34 in)  Lars Riedel (GER) Wiesbaden 3 May 1997
8 71.32 m (233 ft 11​34 in)  Ben Plucknett (USA) Eugene 4 June 1983
9 71.29 m (233 ft 10​12 in)  Daniel Ståhl (SWE) Sollentuna 29 June 2017
10 71.26 m (233 ft 9​12 in)  John Powell (USA) San Jose 9 June 1984
71.26 m (233 ft 9​12 in)  Rickard Bruch (SWE) Malmö 15 November 1984
71.26 m (233 ft 9​12 in)  Imrich Bugár (TCH) San Jose, CA 25 May 1985
13 71.18 m (233 ft 6​14 in)  Art Burns (USA) San Jose 19 July 1983
14 71.16 m (233 ft 5​12 in)  Wolfgang Schmidt (GDR) Berlin 9 August 1978
15 71.14 m (233 ft 4​34 in)  Anthony Washington (USA) Salinas 22 May 1996
16 71.06 m (233 ft 1​12 in)  Luis Delís (CUB) Havana 21 May 1983
17 70.98 m (232 ft 10​14 in)  Mac Wilkins (USA) Helsinki 9 July 1980
18 70.82 m (232 ft 4 in)  Aleksander Tammert (EST) Denton 15 April 2006
19 70.66 m (231 ft 9​34 in)  Robert Harting (GER) Turnov 22 May 2012
20 70.54 m (231 ft 5 in)  Dmitriy Shevchenko (RUS) Krasnodar 7 May 2002
21 70.38 m (230 ft 10​34 in)  Jay Silvester (USA) Lancaster 16 May 1971
22 70.32 m (230 ft 8​12 in)  Frantz Kruger (RSA) Salon-de-Provence 26 May 2002
23 70.06 m (229 ft 10​14 in)  Romas Ubartas (LTU) Smalininkai 8 May 1988
24 70.00 m (229 ft 7​34 in)  Juan Martínez (CUB) Havana 21 May 1983
25 69.95 m (229 ft 5​34 in)  Zoltán Kővágó (HUN) Salon-de-Provence 25 May 2006